Home FAQ'S
Amherst Roofing, Inc. of Naples, Florida | Print |
  1. Does the contractor have a state license? By state Law, all roof installations must be done by a licensed contractor in Florida. The license number must appear on trucks and advertising. If you are in doubt, call The Department of Business & Professional regulation 1-850-487-1395, or visit www.myfloridalicense.com. Check all forms of identification. An occupational or Business tax license does not qualify an individual to act as a roofing contractor.
  2. Check with County and local building departments. Check with the county building department where you reside and if applicable, the town/city in which you live for specific requirements and contractor history.
  3. Check contractor references. All reputable contractors that have performed work in a close geographical proximity to your home should provide references. Be wary of the claims that they are a “New” contractor or are from “Out of the area”.
  4. Get a written estimate from a few licensed contractors meeting these guidelines. Do not accept verbal commitments, and beware of the fine print on many contracts. Completion time needs to be addressed, materials must be identified and have “Product Approval” as required by the building code, and when comparing prices, make sure the roof systems being proposed are equal. Underlayments vary, as do adhesives, methods, and fastening procedures. All must be clearly identified. Significant delays in getting the materials for your project may be a red flag for the contractor’s financial stability and/or track record. Ask the contractor about their employees. Are they employees or subcontractors? Using “Out of town” subcontractors became popular after the past few storm seasons. This may compromise quality.
  5. Beware of sales pitches and dishonest individuals. If the contractor claims to be the fastest and the cheapest, hiring them may result in poor workmanship, inferior materials, or unfinished jobs. Unlicensed contractors target the uninformed or elderly an often go door to door frequently traveling in either “Unmarked” vehicles or using portable signs temporarily stuck to the side of the vehicle. They may offer a post office box in lieu of a physical street address.
  6. Does the contractor have the proper insurance? Roofing is a tough, risky business where injuries and damage claims occur. Professional contractors will maintain insurance to properly cover their employees and customers. Ask to see copies, and verify current coverage with the listed insurance agent. Policies should be in the name of the company proposing the work, not an individual or company officer.
  7. Make sure the contractor gets the building permits. Every installation requires permits and inspections by the local building officials. Ask to see the permits when they are obtained, and evidence of all completed inspections prior to making “Final” payment.
  8. Contracts should include: The contractors name, address, telephone number and state license number, along with a precise description of the work to be completed; including a schedule, list of materials, cleanup provisions, and all warranty agreements. Wood fastening and replacement, if applicable, should be identified both in quantity and cost.

     

TYPES OF ROOF COVERING

There are many types of Roof systems available to the Homeowner today. It can get confusing because unprofessional or unlicensed contractors prefer to market products that allow them to bid “Cheaper”, or provide “Faster” production, regardless if the products provide the waterproofing capability or longevity that the homeowner desires.

After the removal of the “Old” roof system, and all rotten wood has been replaced, the wood should be refastened in accordance with the requirements of the building code. When this is completed, the inspector will usually perform an inspection and make a notation on the permit document. The next step is the installation of the underlayments, which is where the differences in types of material and methods get confusing.

Underlayment, is “An asphalt-saturated felt or other sheet material (may be self-adhering) installed between the roof deck and the roof system, usually in a steep-slope roof construction. Underlayment is primarily used to separate the roof covering from the roof deck, to shed water, and to provide secondary weather protection for the roof area of the building”.

With the recent building code changes and insurance industry requirements, the underlayment of your roof system is critical. The underlayment can be the most important factor in determining the longevity and waterproofing capability of your new roof system.

The discrepancies and expected performance of a two-ply hot mopped underlayment system, or a single application of self adhering underlayment system, need to be investigated using the sources provided. The homeowner should have a clear understanding of the differences, pros and cons of each, and the cost differential. The “2-ply” hot mopped system has been around for years, and is the old standard where you have a crew mechanically fasten a dry-in sheet, followed by a heavier sheet installed in an application of hot asphalt. Installed properly, this system will provide many years of leak free waterproofing. It is generically similar to the systems used on many commercial flat roof applications for over a century. The “Self-Adhering” underlayment, also called “Peel-and-Stick”, is relatively new compared with the hot-asphalt system, and often is installed directly to the wood sheathing, eliminating the mechanically fastened “Dry-in” sheet. It is installed by removing the contact paper from the rear of the sheet, then setting the sheet in place and “Sticking” it down to the wood sheathing. Installers should be professionally trained to assure the correct installation procedures and detail requirements. When installed properly, this underlayment can also provide many years of leak-free service.

Roof covering choices

Asphalt composition Shingles: The composite asphalt shingle roof system for many of us is what we grew up with in the northern geographical areas, prior to our jump down to Florida for the warmer climate. The asphalt shingle is comprised of shingle strips that get overlapped and nailed to the roof deck thru the underlayment. There are many types on the market today, allowing the homeowner a vast number of choices in color, design, and thickness. The material composition has improved over the past several years, increasing the shingles ability to resist fungus growth, and more importantly; provide greater wind resistance.

Caldwell Roofing

Concrete/Clay Tile: Tile roofs are a popular choice of roof covering in South Florida and they have been for decades. Roof tile is made up of concrete or clay, and comes in many shapes, sizes, and colors. The installation method for tile has varied over the years, from using a concrete mixture as the primary method of adhesion, to nails and/or screws, and more recently to the use of a “Foam” adhesive. There is a cost difference associated with the different installation methods, as is their ability to resist wind. The “Product Approvals”, as mentioned earlier, are required by government agencies during the permitting process and indicate the wind “Uplift” pressure designs for each method. This information can be helpful in providing the homeowner with a better understanding of the pros and cons to specific methods, but also can be confusing. Discuss these methods with your professional contractor. Additionally, the major tile manufacturers have extensive information available through their customer service phone lines and their websites, where you can also get an idea of the different shapes and colors of available tile. The shape of Roof tile generally is either flat, or provides a rounded peak. The rounded (“Roll”, “Spanish S”, “Barrel”) tile has become popular in the past several years, especially with the new construction and real estate growth experienced in our area over the past decade. The difference in the rounded tiles is basically the size of the “Roll”, whether it’s a couple of small rounded Peaks (Roll Tile) or 1 large rounded Peak (Spanish “S”). Barrel tile is the larger single ½ round tile that is installed over a bottom single ½ round tile, also called caps and pans. This is the most expensive and used less frequently than the others. The colors, shapes, and sizes purely dictate the overall cost and aesthetic appearance of the finished roof and should be reviewed extensively. The best way to get a clear picture of which tile would have a pleasing aesthetic appearance is to see the preferred tile installed on an actual home. Deciding on a tile from brochures or small samples does not provide an accurate representation of what a specific tile would look like on your home. Some tile manufacturers and professional contractors have showrooms, which give the homeowner the opportunity to see several types, styles, and colors of available tile, and also will provide guidance during the selection process.

Caldwell Roofing

Metal Roof Systems: We have witnessed a growth in metal roofing over the past several years. While used primarily in commercial applications up until a few years ago, metal roof manufacturers have introduced different systems to accommodate different architectural appearances for homeowners. Metal “Panel” systems have a “Flat” panel style appearance, similar to what is often termed the “Key West” style, while some recent products provide either a “Tile” look, or a dimensional look with textured surfaces that look similar in design to concrete or clay tile. Reviewing these roof systems should be done in the same manner in which the tile selection process is outlined above.

Caldwell Roofing

Wood “Shake” shingles: Wood shingles, or “Shakes”, are wood shingles made from cedar. They provide a more rustic appearance to a residence than any of the previously mentioned styles of roof coverings. They are installed using nails thru the underlayment system. Although not as common as years ago, in certain geographic areas the appearance is desired, and when maintained properly, cedar shakes can provide years of service. In today’s marketplace, there are also manufacturers that offer products made from composite materials that aesthetically resemble cedar shakes, without the costs associated with the maintenance of real wood.

Bottom line

There are a vast number of contractors, materials, and manufacturers available to the homeowner. Following a couple of key steps outlined above when selecting a contractor, followed by a thorough investigation with regards to the specific roof type desired, can eliminate many of the questions and concerns that arise with such a significant purchase. With the current costs associated with roofing work, we are all wiser for spending a little more time to insure a “Value” added purchase…not simply a “Cheap” roof. For the large investment we are about to make, receiving the best possible system will provide peace of mind when summer time rolls around.

Call Amherst Roofing today for a Free Estimate at 239-594-1133.

 
Roofing Questions we get all The time | Print |

Questions We Get All the Time About Roofing

Amherst Roofing serves all of Collier County, Florida and Lee County of Florida. Located in Naples, Florida.


Roofing FAQ

At Amherst Roofing we are committed to the highest level of customer service. This includes open, honest and frequent communications with our customers. We encourage your questions and enjoy answering them. Here are some of the questions we hear most frequently.

Q. How much will my new roof cost?
A. The cost of your roof will depend on its size, shape, slope and the number of existing roof layers, along with the materials you choose for the roof. We’ll be happy to provide a free estimate the same day we come to inspect your roof.

Q. Do you charge for estimates?
A. No, we provide written estimates free of charge.

Q. What is the best type of roofing material for my home?
A. We will inspect your home to determine the best methods, materials, warranties, and prices for your home. Amherst Roofing can install shingles, tiles or metal roofing systems, giving you a wide variety of choices. We also can repair flat roofs and much more.

Q. Can you install a new roof over the existing roof?
A. Yes, but the preferred method is to remove the old roof. Removal allows for inspection of the substrate, and the elimination of any wet, rough, and/or unstable existing materials.

Q. What do you do with debris from my old roof?
A. All debris is haules away to the landfill and disposed of properly.

Q. What kind of roofing warranties will I get?
A. Material warranties are usually issued by the manufacturers for periods of five (5) to fifty (50) years, depending on the materials. Amherst Roofing also offers our own guarantee of workmanship.

Q. Will you make a mess of my property?
A. Roofing can be messy, but neatness is very important to us. We protect shrubs, landscaping and the surround yard, and clean our work area and the surround yard area at the conclusion of every workday.

Q. How long will it take to install my roof?
A. Most residential roofs can be replaced in one day. If additional days are required, we’ll secure your home against the weather overnight.

Q. Can I choose my own roof color?
A. It used to be you had a very limited choice in colors for shingles or tile. Today’s roofs, however, are available in a much wider array of colors and styles, in shingle, tile or metal.

Amherst Roofing provides free estimates for all types

Trust the roofing contractors AMHERST ROOFING for high quality, service and value. Call Amherst Roofing today at: 239-594-1133 to schedule a FREE roof checkup and a Free Roof Estimate.

 
Some of your top Roofing Questions | Print |

Amherst Roofing of Naples, Florida answers some of your top Roofing Questions.

1. When purchasing a roofing job, what should I expect?

Answer: The roofers will come out, remove your old roof, install a new roof and clean up after themselves.

2. It seems pretty simple, but what can go wrong?

Answer: You can sign a contract, pay a down payment and never see the roofer again or you can sign a contract, they deliver the materials on your roof, set a dumpster in the front of your garage and you never see them again. There are many variations on this scheme, all with the same result. Hopefully, the scheme plays itself out before your roof is torn off and your house is exposed.

3. What can I do to protect myself?

Answer: Do not hire anyone who is not licensed, bonded and insured, and never hire anyone who does not have an advertisement in the yellow pages. Select a contractor that has operated in your community for at least ten years. Do not give any money for work that has not been already done. Always ask for a release of lien before paying your balance. Always ask for a material vendors release of lien before paying your bill.

4. What if the contractor tells me that they did not put a lien on my house?

Answer: The materials vendor can send a Notice To Owner within 45 days of the last materials he supplied for your home. He then has one year to file a lien. Get a release for any materials that should have been used on your house.

5. Are all roofing contractors listed in the yellow pages licensed, bonded and insured?

Answer: No, they are supposed to be, but the yellow pages does not verify this information. Usually the ads are very misleading, to find out the real story on someone, go to MyFlorida.com. You may find that someone who advertises they have been in business in Florida since 1960, was born in 1960, opened in 1985, was out of business in 1987, reopened again in 1988 then out of business again in 1990, etc. Always ask for at least three references and call them.

6. Is a permit required and if so how can I verify one was purchased?

Answer: In order to buy a permit, the contractor needs a Notice of Commencement signed and notarized by the owner if the work is started without one, start to worry. Most contractors will run the legal for you and provide a notary to come to your home and notarize your signature. They then file the Notice of Commencement and purchase the permit. The permit should be posted on your home for you to see. If you are unsure, call the building department and make sure a permit was purchased before you pay your bill.

7. How can I tell if my roofer is licensed?

Answer: Ask to see their roofing license. It should either be a State Certified Roofing Licensed or a Local Roofing License; an Occupational License is not a Roofing License, but it is required to purchase a Roofing License. You cannot legally pull a permit, or do a roofing job without a Roofing License. If in doubt call the Building Department or check www.MyFlorida.com.

8. What does it mean to be Bonded and Insured?

Answer: In order to have a license, you must post a bond. The theory behind the bond is to insure that if you damage someone's home, the homeowner can go to the bonding company for repair costs. The problem is that the cost of the bond has not kept up with inflation. If someone does three to four million dollars annually and you are number fifteen on the list, a 10,000.00 bond will not go far.Everyone is supposed to have liability insurance, unfortunately, there is no real check to make sure that they do not have a 100,000.00 liability policy with a 50,000.00 deductible or if once the license was purchased the insurance policy was cancelled. Ask to see the policy. Insurance companies will provide a copy of the policy for free.

9. Can I get someone to do my home with a Worker's Compensation Exemption?

Answer: Yes, anyone who is incorporated and has three people or less, all three of the owners can be exempt. However, Worker's Compensation on owners is inexpensive, only fifteen to twenty percent. Foremen cost less as well, only the roofers who are really at risk are expensive and even then the cost is less than fifty percent. There is also a Drug Free Workplace discount and a five percent Safety discount, and they are a member of FRSA's (Florida Roofing and Sheet Medal Association) Self Insurance Program, there are mid year and year end discounts. Usually, the average bottom line cost is under thirty percent.

10. I understand that Worker's Compensation Insurance is very expensive. Aren't most serious accidents on large Commercial projects?

Answer: Studies have shown that most serious injuries per dollar volume happen to small residential crews. Why leave your home exposed? Make sure your contractor carries Worker'sCompensation insurance. The cost of Worker's Compensation is less than ten percent of the total cost of the roof, so why take the chance?

11. How do I know which roof to buy?

Answer: Let your roofing professional help you.

Here Are Some Guidelines: Every neighborhood has a basis for your roof. Most asphalt shingles in Florida last about half of the marketed warranty. So, a thirty-year warranty would really only last about fifteen years.There are some shingles that carry a very long extended warranty. They are not perfect, but if you are careful and close the loopholes, they might be a good investment.

For more information call Amherst Roofing at: 239-594-1133. Amherst Roofing has been serving Naples, Marco Island, Bonita Springs and all of Lee and Collier Counties since 1987.  Call today for a free estimate.

 
Questions you should ask your Roofing Contractor | Print |

Amherst Roofing of Collier County is here to help you with all your Roofing questions and concerns. Listed below are some of the most thought questions.

1. When purchasing a roofing job, what should I expect?

Answer: The roofers will come out, remove your old roof, install a new roof and clean up after themselves.

2. It seems pretty simple, but what can go wrong?

Answer: You can sign a contract, pay a down payment and never see the roofer again or you can sign a contract, they deliver the materials on your roof, set a dumpster in the front of your garage and you never see them again. There are many variations on this scheme, all with the same result. Hopefully, the scheme plays itself out before your roof is torn off and your house is exposed.

3. What can I do to protect myself?

Answer: Do not hire anyone who is not licensed, bonded and insured, and never hire anyone who does not have an advertisement in the yellow pages. Select a contractor that has operated in your community for at least ten years. Do not give any money for work that has not been already done. Always ask for a release of lien before paying your balance. Always ask for a material vendors release of lien before paying your bill.

4. What if the contractor tells me that they did not put a lien on my house?

Answer: The materials vendor can send a Notice To Owner within 45 days of the last materials he supplied for your home. He then has one year to file a lien. Get a release for any materials that should have been used on your house.

5. Are all roofing contractors listed in the yellow pages licensed, bonded and insured?

Answer: No, they are supposed to be, but the yellow pages does not verify this information. Usually the ads are very misleading, to find out the real story on someone, go to MyFlorida.com. You may find that someone who advertises they have been in business in Florida since 1960, was born in 1960, opened in 1985, was out of business in 1987, reopened again in 1988 then out of business again in 1990, etc. Always ask for at least three references and call them.

6. Is a permit required and if so how can I verify one was purchased?

Answer: In order to buy a permit, the contractor needs a Notice of Commencement signed and notarized by the owner if the work is started without one, start to worry. Most contractors will run the legal for you and provide a notary to come to your home and notarize your signature. They then file the Notice of Commencement and purchase the permit. The permit should be posted on your home for you to see. If you are unsure, call the building department and make sure a permit was purchased before you pay your bill.

7. How can I tell if my roofer is licensed?

Answer: Ask to see their roofing license. It should either be a State Certified Roofing Licensed or a Local Roofing License; an Occupational License is not a Roofing License, but it is required to purchase a Roofing License. You cannot legally pull a permit, or do a roofing job without a Roofing License. If in doubt call the Building Department or check www.MyFlorida.com.

8. What does it mean to be Bonded and Insured?

Answer: In order to have a license, you must post a bond. The theory behind the bond is to insure that if you damage someone's home, the homeowner can go to the bonding company for repair costs. The problem is that the cost of the bond has not kept up with inflation. If someone does three to four million dollars annually and you are number fifteen on the list, a 10,000.00 bond will not go far.Everyone is supposed to have liability insurance, unfortunately, there is no real check to make sure that they do not have a 100,000.00 liability policy with a 50,000.00 deductible or if once the license was purchased the insurance policy was cancelled. Ask to see the policy. Insurance companies will provide a copy of the policy for free.

9. Can I get someone to do my home with a Worker's Compensation Exemption?

Answer: Yes, anyone who is incorporated and has three people or less, all three of the owners can be exempt. However, Worker's Compensation on owners is inexpensive, only fifteen to twenty percent. Foremen cost less as well, only the roofers who are really at risk are expensive and even then the cost is less than fifty percent. There is also a Drug Free Workplace discount and a five percent Safety discount, and they are a member of FRSA's (Florida Roofing and Sheet Medal Association) Self Insurance Program, there are mid year and year end discounts. Usually, the average bottom line cost is under thirty percent.

10. I understand that Worker's Compensation Insurance is very expensive. Aren't most serious accidents on large Commercial projects?

Answer: Studies have shown that most serious injuries per dollar volume happen to small residential crews. Why leave your home exposed? Make sure your contractor carries Worker'sCompensation insurance. The cost of Worker's Compensation is less than ten percent of the total cost of the roof, so why take the chance?

11. How do I know which roof to buy?

Answer: Let your roofing professional help you.

Here Are Some Guidelines: Every neighborhood has a basis for your roof. Most asphalt shingles in Florida last about half of the marketed warranty. So, a thirty-year warranty would really only last about fifteen years.There are some shingles that carry a very long extended warranty. They are not perfect, but if you are careful and close the loopholes, they might be a good investment.

Amherst Roofing can answer all your roofing concerns, call us today at: 239-594-1133. We will discuss your concerns and provide you with a free estimate.

 
Roofing Terminology | Print |


 
| Print |
Roofing Terms You Should Know:
Amherst Roofing, Inc. thought it would be a good idea if our customers knew some of our roofing terms.
Asphalt: A bituminous waterproofing agent applied to roofing materials during manufacturing. Asphalt plastic roofing cement: An asphalt based cement used to bond roofing materials, including flashing.
Base flashing: That portion of the flashing attached to or resting on the deck to direct the flow of water onto the roof covering.
Blisters: Bubbles that may appear on the surface of asphalt roofing after installation.
Built-up roof: A flat or low-sloped roof consisting of multiple layers of asphalt and ply sheets.
Butt edge: The lower edge of the shingle tabs.
Caulk: To fill a joint with mastic or asphalt cement to prevent leaks.
Coating: A layer of viscous asphalt applied to the base material into which granules or other surfacing is embedded.
Collar: Pre-formed flange placed over a vent pipe to seal the roof around the vent pipe opening. Sometimes called vent sleeve.
Counter flashing: That portion of the flashing attached to a vertical surface to prevent water from migrating behind the base flashing.
Course: A row of shingles or roll roofing running the length of the roof.
Cricket: A peaked saddle construction at the back of a chimney to prevent accumulation of snow and ice and to deflect water around the chimney.
Cutout: The open portions of a strip shingle between the tabs.
Deck: The surface installed over the supporting framing members to which the roofing is applied.
Dormer: A framed window unit projecting through the sloping plane of a roof.
Downspout: A pipe for draining water from roof gutters. Also known as a leader.
Drip edge: A non-corrosive, non-staining material used along the eaves and rakes to allow water run-off to drip clear of underlying construction.
Eaves: The horizontal, lower edge of a sloped roof.
Eave flashing: Additional layer of roofing material applied at the eaves to help prevent damage from water back-up.
Edging strips: Boards nailed along eaves and rakes after cutting back existing wood shingles to provide secure edges for reroofing with asphalt shingles.
Feathering strips: Tapered wood filler strips placed along the butts of old wood shingles to create a level surface when reroofing over existing wood shingle roofs.
Felt: Fibrous material saturated with asphalt and used as an underlayment or sheathing paper.
Fiberglass mat: An asphalt roofing base material manufactured from glass fibers.
Flashing: Pieces of galvanized metal (usually aluminum or copper) or roll roofing used to prevent seepage of water into a building around any intersection or projection in a roof such as vent pipes, chimneys, adjoining walls, dormers and valleys.
Free-tab shingles: Shingles that do not contain factory-applied strips or spots of self-sealing adhesive.
Gable: The upper portion of a sidewall that comes to a triangular point at the ridge of a sloping roof.
Gable roof: A type of roof containing sloping planes of the same pitch on each side of the ridge, with a gable at each end.
Gambrel roof: A type of roof containing two sloping planes of different pitch on each side of the ridge. The lower plane has a steeper slope than the upper. Contains a gable at each end.
Granules: Ceramic-coated colored crushed rock that is applied to the exposed surface of asphalt roofing products.
Gutter: The trough that channels water from the eaves to the downspouts.
Hip: The inclined external angle formed by the intersection of two sloping roof planes. Runs from the ridge to the eaves.
Hip roof: A type of roof containing sloping planes of the same pitch on each of four sides No gables.
Hip shingles: Shingles used to cover the inclined external angle formed by the intersection of two sloping roof planes.
Ice dam: Condition formed at the lower roof edge by the thawing and re-freezing of melted snow on the overhang. Can force water up and under shingles, causing leaks.
Interlocking shingles: Individual shingles that mechanically fasten to each other to provide wind resistance.
Laminated shingles: Strip shingles containing more than one layer of tabs to create extra thickness. Also known as three-dimensional shingles or architectural shingles.
Lap: To cover the surface of one shingles or roll with another.
Lap cement: An asphalt based cement used to adhere overlapping plies of roll roofing.
Mansard roof: A type of roof containing two sloping planes of different pitch on each of four sides. The lower plane has a much steeper pitch than the upper, often approaching vertical. Contains no gables.
Masonry primer: An asphalt-based primer used to prepare masonry surfaces for bonding with other asphalt products.
Mineral-surfaced roofing: Asphalt shingles and roll roofing that are covered with granules.
Nesting: A method of reroofing with new asphalt shingles over old shingles in which the top edge of the new shingle is butted against the bottom edge of the existing shingle tab.
No-cutout shingles: Shingles consisting of a single, solid tab with no cutouts.
Open valley: Method of valley construction in which shingles on both sides of the valley are trimmed along a chalk line snapped on each side of the valley. Shingles do not extend across the valley. Valley flashing is exposed.
Organic felt: An asphalt roofing base material manufactured from cellulose fibers.
Overhang: That portion of the roof structure that extends beyond the exterior walls of a building.
Pitch: The degree of roof incline expressed as the ratio of the rise, in feet, to the span, in feet.
Ply: The number of layers of roofing: i.e. one-ply, two-ply.
Rafter: The supporting framing member immediately beneath the deck, sloping from the ridge to the wall plate.
Rake: The inclined edge of a sloped roof over a wall.
Ridge: The uppermost, horizontal external angle formed by the intersection of two sloping roof planes.
Ridge shingles or ridge cap: Shingles used to cover the horizontal external angle formed by the intersection of two sloping roof planes.
Rise: The vertical distance from the eaves line to the ridge.
Roll roofing: Asphalt roofing products manufactured in roll form.
Roofing tape: An asphalt-saturated tape used with asphalt cements for flashing and patching asphalt roofing.
Run: The horizontal distance from the eaves to a point directly under the ridge.
Saturant: Asphalt used to impregnate an organic felt base material.
Self-sealing shingles: Shingles containing factory-applied strips or spots of self-sealing adhesive.
Self-sealing strip or spot: Factory-applied adhesive that bonds shingle courses together when exposed to the heat of the sun after application.
Shading: Slight differences in shingle color that may occur as a result of normal manufacturing operations.
Sheathing: Exterior grade boards used as a roof deck material.
Shed roof: A roof containing only one sloping plane. No hip, ridges, valleys or gables.
Slope: The degree of roof incline expressed as the ratio of the rise, in inches, to the run, in feet.
Smooth-surfaced roofing: Roll roofing that is covered with ground talc or mica instead of granules (coated).
Soffit: The finished underside of the eaves.
Soil stack: A vent pipe that penetrates the roof.
Span: The horizontal distance from eaves to eaves.
Square: A unit of roof measure covering 100 square feet. A roof with a field area of 2,500 square feet would be called a 25 square roof.
Starter strip: Asphalt roofing applied at the eaves that provide protection by filling in the spaces under the cutouts and joints of the first course of shingles.
Step flashing: Flashing application method used where a vertical surface meets a sloping roof plane.
Tab: The exposed portion of strip shingles defined by cutouts.
Top lap: That portion of the roofing covered by the succeeding course after installation.
Underlayment: Asphalt saturated felt used beneath roofing to provide additional protection for the deck.
Valley: The internal angle formed by the intersection of two sloping roof planes.
Vapor retarder: Any material used to prevent the passage of water vapor.
Vent: Any outlet for air that protrudes through the roof deck such as a pipe or stack. Any device installed on the roof, gable or soffit for the purpose of ventilating the underside of the roof deck.
 
Call Amherst Roofing today if you have any questions about the above roofing terms at: 239-594-1133.
 
Some questions you may have before putting on a New Roof | Print |
Amherst Roofing, Inc., Things to think about before hiring just any Roofing Contractor | Print |

 

It seems pretty simple, but what can go wrong?

Answer: You can sign a contract, pay a down payment and never see the roofer again or you can sign a contract, they deliver the materials on your roof, set a dumpster in the front of your garage and you never see them again. There are many variations on this scheme, all with the same result. Hopefully, the scheme plays itself out before your roof is torn off and your house is exposed.

What can I do to protect myself?

Answer: Do not hire anyone who is not licensed, bonded and insured, and never hire anyone who does not have an advertisement in the yellow pages. Select a contractor that has operated in your community for at least ten years. Do not give any money for work that has not been already done. Always ask for a release of lien before paying your balance. Always ask for a material vendors release of lien before paying your bill.

What if the contractor tells me that they did not put a lien on my house?

Answer: The materials vendor can send a Notice To Owner within 45 days of the last materials he supplied for your home. He then has one year to file a lien. Get a release for any materials that should have been used on your house.

Are all roofing contractors listed in the yellow pages licensed, bonded and insured?

Answer: No, they are supposed to be, but the yellow pages does not verify this information. Usually the ads are very misleading, to find out the real story on someone, go to MyFlorida.com. You may find that someone who advertises they have been in business in Florida since 1960, was born in 1960, opened in 1985, was out of business in 1987, reopened again in 1988 then out of business again in 1990, etc. Always ask for at least three references and call them.

Is a permit required and if so how can I verify one was purchased?

Answer: In order to buy a permit, the contractor needs a Notice of Commencement signed and notarized by the owner if the work is started without one, start to worry. Most contractors will run the legal for you and provide a notary to come to your home and notarize your signature. They then file the Notice of Commencement and purchase the permit. The permit should be posted on your home for you to see. If you are unsure, call the building department and make sure a permit was purchased before you pay your bill.

How can I tell if my roofer is licensed?

Answer: Ask to see their roofing license. It should either be a State Certified Roofing Licensed or a Local Roofing License; an Occupational License is not a Roofing License, but it is required to purchase a Roofing License. You cannot legally pull a permit, or do a roofing job without a Roofing License. If in doubt call the Building Department or check www.MyFlorida.com.

What does it mean to be Bonded and Insured?

Answer: In order to have a license, you must post a bond. The theory behind the bond is to insure that if you damage someone's home, the homeowner can go to the bonding company for repair costs. The problem is that the cost of the bond has not kept up with inflation. If someone does three to four million dollars annually and you are number fifteen on the list, a 10,000.00 bond will not go far.Everyone is supposed to have liability insurance, unfortunately, there is no real check to make sure that they do not have a 100,000.00 liability policy with a 50,000.00 deductible or if once the license was purchased the insurance policy was cancelled. Ask to see the policy. Insurance companies will provide a copy of the policy for free.

Can I get someone to do my home with a Worker's Compensation Exemption?

Answer: Yes, anyone who is incorporated and has three people or less, all three of the owners can be exempt. However, Worker's Compensation on owners is inexpensive, only fifteen to twenty percent. Foremen cost less as well, only the roofers who are really at risk are expensive and even then the cost is less than fifty percent. There is also a Drug Free Workplace discount and a five percent Safety discount, and they are a member of FRSA's (Florida Roofing and Sheet Medal Association) Self Insurance Program, there are mid year and year end discounts. Usually, the average bottom line cost is under thirty percent.

I understand that Worker's Compensation Insurance is very expensive. Aren't most serious accidents on large Commercial projects?

Answer: Studies have shown that most serious injuries per dollar volume happen to small residential crews. Why leave your home exposed? Make sure your contractor carries Worker'sCompensation insurance. The cost of Worker's Compensation is less than ten percent of the total cost of the roof, so why take the chance?

How do I know which roof to buy?

Answer: Call Amherst Roofing, today, we have been in businees since 1987 and have 25 years experience behind us to help you make the right decision.

 
Do you do provide free estimates? | Print |
Yes. Amherst will visit your home or business and provide you with a free estimate for services.
 
How long have you been in business? | Print |
We have been in business sin 1987.
 
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