Home FAQ'S
Commonly Asked Questions, Amherst Roofing, Naples, FL | Print |
Q: How can a home owner recognize when a roof system has problems? A: All too often, roof system problems are discovered after leaking or other serious damage occurs. Periodic (twice-a-year) inspections often can uncover cracked, warped or missing shingles; loose seams and deteriorated flashings; excessive surface granules accumulating in the gutters or downspouts; and other visible signs of roof system problems. Indoors, look for cracked paint, discolored plasterboard and peeling wallpaper as signs of damaged roof areas. Q: What are my options if I decide to reroof? A: You have two basic options: You can choose a complete replacement of the roof system, involving a tear-off of your existing roof system, or re-cover the existing roof system, involving only the installation of a new roof system. If you've already had one re-cover installed on your original roof system, check with a professional roofing contractor. In many instances, building code requirements allow no more than one roof system re-cover before a complete replacement is necessary. Q: My roof leaks. Do I need to have it replaced completely? A: Not necessarily. Leaks can result from flashings that have come loose or a section of the roof system being damaged. A complete roof system failure, however, generally is irreversible and a result of improper installation or choice of materials or the roof system installation is inappropriate for the home or building. Q: Can I do the work myself? A: Most work should not be done yourself. Professional roofing contractors are trained to safely and efficiently repair or replace roof systems. You can damage your roof system by using improper roofing techniques and severely injure yourself by falling off or through the roof. Maintenance performed by home and building owners should be confined to inspecting roof systems during the fall and spring to check for cracked or curling shingles and cleaning gutters filled with dead leaves and other debris. If you must inspect your roof system yourself, use a firmly braced or tied-off ladder equipped with rubber safety feet. Wear rubber-soled shoes and stay on the ladder (and off the roof system), if possible. Q: How long can I expect my roof system to last? A: Most new roof systems are designed to provide useful service for about 20 years. Some roof system types, such as slate, clay tile and certain metal (e.g., copper) systems, can last longer. Actual roof system life span is determined by a number of factors, including local climatic and environmental conditions, proper building and roof system design, material quality and suitability, proper application and adequate roof maintenance. Roofing product manufacturers offer a variety of warranties on their products. Take a close look at those warranties to see what responsibilities and financial obligations manufacturers will assume if their products fail to reach their expected lives. Q: What will a new roof system cost? A: The price of a new roof system varies widely, depending on such things as the materials selected, contractor doing the work, home or building, location of the home or building, local labor rates and time of year. To get a good idea of price for your roof system, get three or four proposals from reputable contractors in your area. Keep in mind that price is only one factor, and it must be balanced with the quality of the materials and workmanship. For each roofing material, there are different grades and corresponding prices. There also are a variety of styles and shapes. You need to look at the full product range and make a choice based on your budget and needs. Within the roofing profession, there are different levels of expertise and craftsmanship. Insist on a contractor who is committed to quality work. Q: How can I determine my annual roofing cost? A: When considering your roofing options, the following formula may help: Total Cost (Materials and Labor) ÷ Life Expectancy of Roof System (in years) = Annual Roofing Cost
 
FREQUENTLY ASKED ROOFING QUESTIONS | Print |

AMHERST ROOFING OF NAPLES, FLORIDA

My roof leaks. Do I need to have it totally replaced?

Not necessarily. Leaking can result from damage done to a section of the roof or from flashing coming loose. A roof failure, however, is generally irreversible and result from improper installation or choice of materials, or from the installation of a roof system inappropriate to the building.

How should I prepare for the installation of my new roof?

You should remove all loose items from your walls and shelves. The constant hammering may cause enough vibration to shake these items down. Make sure you have your driveway clear as well as the areas surrounding your home. This is because of the chance that material from the tear off could fall in the driveway or the area directly around your home. This will also give your contractor a place to store the material for your new roof as well as a place for the dumpster. Make sure the contractor puts plywood down in the driveway to protect it.

How long does it take to replace a roof?

Re-roof or new construction all depends on the type of roof, the weather, and the inspections needed. Generally for a small family home it can take a few days to large commercial projects that can take a few weeks to a few months. As long as your contractor manages the project closely and efficiently, the project should move smoothly.

How long should a roof last?

Like any building component, roofs degrade at different rates depending on a large number of factors: the quality of original construction, the level of abuse, the level of maintenance, appropriateness of design, etc. So how long should a roof last? We have seen poorly designed and installed roofs go as few as six or seven years before they failed, and we have seen old coal tar built up roofs that were 60 years old. Most building owners, roofing contractors and designers feel 20 years is an acceptable service life. Please keep in mind that in the hot Florida climate most roofing systems do not last as long as they do in other climates. Make sure when choosing your roof, you ask what the service life is in Florida, you might be surprised to find that a lot of them do not last for the full warranty and manufactures warranties

What is a roofing underlayment?

A roofing underlayment is typically a membrane that goes under the roof covering to help prevent water intrusion. One type of underlayment comes in rolls and is laid out across the roof and attached with ring shank nails or simplex nails this is called 30#. Another type of underlayment is adhered directly to the deck of the roof; this is considered by many insurance companies as Secondary Water Barrier and is called Peel & Stick. However in Miami-Dade County you can not apply this directly to the deck, you must first use a nailed (30#) underlayment and then the Peel & Stick underlayment. Most insurance companies will not give Secondary Water Barrier credit for Peel & Stick that is not direct to deck. Your underlayment is the one piece of the complete roof system that is solely designed to be the water proofing for your roof. This is true for all roofs except metal roofing where the metal is actually the water proof component, with extra protection from the underlayment.

Can I do my roofing work myself, or should I hire a contractor?

Most roofing work should not be done yourself. Manufactures generally will not give a warranty if you do not have a professional roofer install the product. Professionals are trained to handle the environment on the roof and can handle the conditions that may present themselves when doing a roofing job. The dangers to a homeowner with trying to do your own roof work could be a lot more expensive than just hiring a roofing professional to come out and do the work.

What can I do about mildew on my roof?

When your roof gets dirty there are several solutions that you can go with. One of the safest and least expensive ways to go is to use a product called roof a cide. This is an environment friendly product that you have installed on your roof every two years. This product has a two year warranty that guarantees your roof will stay clean for that period of time. This solution should be done by a qualified contractor as well and the warranty will not be given if it is not done by one of roof a cides installers. Once you have had this product sprayed on your roof, you should not ever have to clean it again.

Can I cover over my existing roof?

Installing a new roof over the top of an existing roof is generally acceptable under these guidelines: 1) A building can not have more than two roofs: 2) No wet insulation can be left in place: 3) the roof structure must be able to handle the additional roof load: 4) the new roof must be attached to the roof deck to meet wind loads (it is not generally acceptable to adhere the new roof to the old roof).

How many roofs can I put on?

Most building codes allow a structure to have two roof membranes in place, but not a third. The codes are also now requiring all roof layers to be removed once the two roof limit has been reached, when looking to install the third roof.

When is the best time to put a new roof on?

This question could be interpreted two ways, so we will answer each question.

1) In Florida there really is no “bad time” to install a new roof. As we all know it rains periodically through the year and rainy season is always. So as a roofer we always watch the weather and pray for no rain until the underlayment is down and secure.

2) The question might be put this way: “How do I know when my roof has failed?” Different types of roofs fail in different ways.

  • Does the roof leak in numerous locations?
  • Do leaks continue, despite repeated repair attempts?
  • Do repairs seem to make leaks worse, or do new leaks develop after rain?
  • How tolerant is the occupancy to leaks? Low leak tolerance generally means the “failure” decision is reached earlier. It is generally better to reroof at the appropriate juncture, rather than poring money and time into ill advised repairs, but there are exceptions.

How can a homeowner recognize when a roof has problems?

All too often, roof problems are discovered after leaking or other serious damage occurs. Periodic (twice a year) inspections can often uncover cracked, warped, or missing shingles, loose seams and deteriorated flashings, excessive surface granules accumulating in the gutters or downspouts, and other visible signs of roof problems. Indoors, look for cracked paint, discolored plasterboard, and peeling wallpaper as signs of damaged roof areas.

What are my options if I decide to reroof?

You have two basic options. You can choose a complete replacement of the roof system, involving tearing off the old system, or you can do a recover over the existing roof, involving going over the existing roof. If you have already had one recover then you can not go over the existing roof.

What is the best roof?

Wouldn’t it be simple if there was one answer to all roofing problems? Unfortunately there is no magic pill in the roofing market that solves all roofing problems. What the market does offer is a wide selection of good products, each having attributes and faults. The key to selecting the proper roof system is to identify the specific roof design of your building and how each roof system works to meet the requirements.

What will a new roof cost?

The price of a new roof all depends on the type of material you select, weather you are removing the old roof or not, the type of underlayment, the price of the permit and so on. Make sure that you get at least three estimate if you believe that the cost is high. However, be sure that if one person comes in higher than the other that you ask the right questions about the type of material being used and the reputation of the company, just because it is cheaper does not mean that it is better. Sometimes the higher priced contractor is the one you want to go with because of their reputation as a well known contractor and because of the quality of the material they are using.

 
Roofing Questions | Print |

 

My roof leaks. Do I need to have it totally replaced?

Not necessarily. Leaking can result from damage done to a section of the roof or from flashing coming loose. A roof failure, however, is generally irreversible and result from improper installation or choice of materials, or from the installation of a roof system inappropriate to the building.

How should I prepare for the installation of my new roof?

You should remove all loose items from your walls and shelves. The constant hammering may cause enough vibration to shake these items down. Make sure you have your driveway clear as well as the areas surrounding your home. This is because of the chance that material from the tear off could fall in the driveway or the area directly around your home. This will also give your contractor a place to store the material for your new roof as well as a place for the dumpster. Make sure the contractor puts plywood down in the driveway to protect it.

How long does it take to replace a roof?

Re-roof or new construction all depends on the type of roof, the weather, and the inspections needed. Generally for a small family home it can take a few days to large commercial projects that can take a few weeks to a few months. As long as your contractor manages the project closely and efficiently, the project should move smoothly.

How long should a roof last?

Like any building component, roofs degrade at different rates depending on a large number of factors: the quality of original construction, the level of abuse, the level of maintenance, appropriateness of design, etc. So how long should a roof last? We have seen poorly designed and installed roofs go as few as six or seven years before they failed, and we have seen old coal tar built up roofs that were 60 years old. Most building owners, roofing contractors and designers feel 20 years is an acceptable service life. Please keep in mind that in the hot Florida climate most roofing systems do not last as long as they do in other climates. Make sure when choosing your roof, you ask what the service life is in Florida, you might be surprised to find that a lot of them do not last for the full warranty and manufactures warranties

What is a roofing underlayment?

A roofing underlayment is typically a membrane that goes under the roof covering to help prevent water intrusion. One type of underlayment comes in rolls and is laid out across the roof and attached with ring shank nails or simplex nails this is called 30#. Another type of underlayment is adhered directly to the deck of the roof; this is considered by many insurance companies as Secondary Water Barrier and is called Peel & Stick. However in Miami-Dade County you can not apply this directly to the deck, you must first use a nailed (30#) underlayment and then the Peel & Stick underlayment. Most insurance companies will not give Secondary Water Barrier credit for Peel & Stick that is not direct to deck. Your underlayment is the one piece of the complete roof system that is solely designed to be the water proofing for your roof. This is true for all roofs except metal roofing where the metal is actually the water proof component, with extra protection from the underlayment.

Can I do my roofing work myself, or should I hire a contractor?

Most roofing work should not be done yourself. Manufactures generally will not give a warranty if you do not have a professional roofer install the product. Professionals are trained to handle the environment on the roof and can handle the conditions that may present themselves when doing a roofing job. The dangers to a homeowner with trying to do your own roof work could be a lot more expensive than just hiring a roofing professional to come out and do the work.

What can I do about mildew on my roof?

When your roof gets dirty there are several solutions that you can go with. One of the safest and least expensive ways to go is to use a product called roof a cide. This is an environment friendly product that you have installed on your roof every two years. This product has a two year warranty that guarantees your roof will stay clean for that period of time. This solution should be done by a qualified contractor as well and the warranty will not be given if it is not done by one of roof a cides installers. Once you have had this product sprayed on your roof, you should not ever have to clean it again.

Can I cover over my existing roof?

Installing a new roof over the top of an existing roof is generally acceptable under these guidelines: 1) A building can not have more than two roofs: 2) No wet insulation can be left in place: 3) the roof structure must be able to handle the additional roof load: 4) the new roof must be attached to the roof deck to meet wind loads (it is not generally acceptable to adhere the new roof to the old roof).

How many roofs can I put on?

Most building codes allow a structure to have two roof membranes in place, but not a third. The codes are also now requiring all roof layers to be removed once the two roof limit has been reached, when looking to install the third roof.

When is the best time to put a new roof on?

This question could be interpreted two ways, so we will answer each question.

1) In Florida there really is no “bad time” to install a new roof. As we all know it rains periodically through the year and rainy season is always. So as a roofer we always watch the weather and pray for no rain until the underlayment is down and secure.

2) The question might be put this way: “How do I know when my roof has failed?” Different types of roofs fail in different ways.

  • Does the roof leak in numerous locations?
  • Do leaks continue, despite repeated repair attempts?
  • Do repairs seem to make leaks worse, or do new leaks develop after rain?
  • How tolerant is the occupancy to leaks? Low leak tolerance generally means the “failure” decision is reached earlier. It is generally better to reroof at the appropriate juncture, rather than poring money and time into ill advised repairs, but there are exceptions.

How can a homeowner recognize when a roof has problems?

All too often, roof problems are discovered after leaking or other serious damage occurs. Periodic (twice a year) inspections can often uncover cracked, warped, or missing shingles, loose seams and deteriorated flashings, excessive surface granules accumulating in the gutters or downspouts, and other visible signs of roof problems. Indoors, look for cracked paint, discolored plasterboard, and peeling wallpaper as signs of damaged roof areas.

What are my options if I decide to reroof?

You have two basic options. You can choose a complete replacement of the roof system, involving tearing off the old system, or you can do a recover over the existing roof, involving going over the existing roof. If you have already had one recover then you can not go over the existing roof.

What is the best roof?

Wouldn’t it be simple if there was one answer to all roofing problems? Unfortunately there is no magic pill in the roofing market that solves all roofing problems. What the market does offer is a wide selection of good products, each having attributes and faults. The key to selecting the proper roof system is to identify the specific roof design of your building and how each roof system works to meet the requirements.

What will a new roof cost?

The price of a new roof all depends on the type of material you select, weather you are removing the old roof or not, the type of underlayment, the price of the permit and so on. Make sure that you get at least three estimate if you believe that the cost is high. However, be sure that if one person comes in higher than the other that you ask the right questions about the type of material being used and the reputation of the company, just because it is cheaper does not mean that it is better. Sometimes the higher priced contractor is the one you want to go with because of their reputation as a well known contractor and because of the quality of the material they are using.

Call Amhert Roofing of Naples, FL today for more information on your roofing needs.  Amherst Roofing serves Naples, FL, Marco Island, Bonita Beach, Golden Gate and Estero.  Amherst Roofing serves all of Collier County and Lee County in Florida.  Call today at 239-594-1133.

 
Roofing Process in Florida | Print |

 

The main goal of a roof is to protect your home from water and other elements. While no two roofs are identical and there are variables in the installation process, there are a few basic steps common to all roofing projects.

  1. The first and perhaps the most important step is choosing a contractor. Make sure the contractor is licensed and insured. Your roof is a major investment and you want the job done right the first time. You should feel confident as well as comfortable with your choice.

  2. Choose the type of roof you want, whether it is shingle, metal, or tile. Discuss your options with the contractor and weigh pros and cons of each type.

  3. The foundation of the roof will be inspected to insure it is sound and in good condition. Any damaged wood will be repaired or replaced.

  4. Felt underlayment is the next "layer" in the roofing process and should be uniform and smooth. If not applied properly, the shingles will not lay properly.

  5. Metal work. Chimneys, vents, and skylights should be flashed and counterflashed to keep water out. A metal drip edge is installed around all perimeter edges, and properly mitered corners and proper lapping is a detail that should not be overlooked.

  6. Shingle Application. There is more to the installation than hammering a nail through a shingle. Attention to detail is important and cannot be overemphasized. A starter row should be installed, chalk lines should be used to insure straight lines, and shingling the valleys properly is a must. Ridges and hips are capped to prevent water from entering where adjacent roof angles meet. All these factors combine to make your roof impervious to water.

  7. Cleanup. Once the job is complete, a final inspection and cleanup is done.

Amherst Roofing will be happy to provide an initial consultation to discuss the entire roofing process with you. Call us today for a free estimate at 239-594-1133.

 
Commonly Asked Questions | Print |

Q:
How can a home owner recognize when a roof system has problems?

A: All too often, roof system problems are discovered after leaking or other serious damage occurs. Periodic (twice-a-year) inspections often can uncover cracked, warped or missing shingles; loose seams and deteriorated flashings; excessive surface granules accumulating in the gutters or downspouts; and other visible signs of roof system problems. Indoors, look for cracked paint, discolored plasterboard and peeling wallpaper as signs of damaged roof areas.

Q: What are my options if I decide to reroof?

A: You have two basic options: You can choose a complete replacement of the roof system, involving a tear-off of your existing roof system, or re-cover the existing roof system, involving only the installation of a new roof system. If you've already had one re-cover installed on your original roof system, check with a professional roofing contractor. In many instances, building code requirements allow no more than one roof system re-cover before a complete replacement is necessary.

Q: My roof leaks. Do I need to have it replaced completely?

A: Not necessarily. Leaks can result from flashings that have come loose or a section of the roof system being damaged. A complete roof system failure, however, generally is irreversible and a result of improper installation or choice of materials or the roof system installation is inappropriate for the home or building.

Q: Can I do the work myself?

A: Most work should not be done yourself. Professional roofing contractors are trained to safely and efficiently repair or replace roof systems. You can damage your roof system by using improper roofing techniques and severely injure yourself by falling off or through the roof.

Maintenance performed by home and building owners should be confined to inspecting roof systems during the fall and spring to check for cracked or curling shingles and cleaning gutters filled with dead leaves and other debris. If you must inspect your roof system yourself, use a firmly braced or tied-off ladder equipped with rubber safety feet. Wear rubber-soled shoes and stay on the ladder (and off the roof system), if possible.

Q: How long can I expect my roof system to last?

A: Most new roof systems are designed to provide useful service for about 20 years. Some roof system types, such as slate, clay tile and certain metal (e.g., copper) systems, can last longer.

Actual roof system life span is determined by a number of factors, including local climatic and environmental conditions, proper building and roof system design, material quality and suitability, proper application and adequate roof maintenance.

Roofing product manufacturers offer a variety of warranties on their products. Take a close look at those warranties to see what responsibilities and financial obligations manufacturers will assume if their products fail to reach their expected lives.

Q: What will a new roof system cost?

A: The price of a new roof system varies widely, depending on such things as the materials selected, contractor doing the work, home or building, location of the home or building, local labor rates and time of year. To get a good idea of price for your roof system, get three or four proposals from reputable contractors in your area. Keep in mind that price is only one factor, and it must be balanced with the quality of the materials and workmanship.

For each roofing material, there are different grades and corresponding prices. There also are a variety of styles and shapes. You need to look at the full product range and make a choice based on your budget and needs.

Within the roofing profession, there are different levels of expertise and craftsmanship. Insist on a contractor who is committed to quality work.

Q: How can I determine my annual roofing cost?

A: When considering your roofing options, the following formula may help:

Total Cost (Materials and Labor) ÷ Life Expectancy of Roof System (in years) = Annual Roofing Cost
 
Information on Shingle Roofs | Print |
Roofing Shingles come in a variety of different styles, colors and warranties. The most common and least expensive shingle has a 20 year warranty and is known as the strip shingle or the 3-tab shingle. The second most common composition shingle is the 30 year dimensional shingle. This shingle is also referred to as the laminated shingle or the architectural shingle. It carries a 30 year warranty and is distinguishable from the 20 year shingle by its thicker, heavier look which was designed to imitate the appearance of wood shingles. Laminated roofing shingles also comes in 40 and 50 year versions which are each slightly thicker than the 30 year shingle but are otherwise exactly the same in appearance.

Although the strip shingle and the laminated shingle account for 95% of all shingle roofs, there are numerous alternatives including hail resistant shingles and specialty roofing shingles.

Types of Roofing Shingles Used in Naples, Florida

  • 3-tab Composition Shingles are by far the most commonly used shingle in America. They have a 20 year warranty and are the most inexpensive roofing material available. Their chief attributes are low price, ease of application and wide selection of available colors. Their disadvantages are relatively short life expectancy and their plain, unadorned appearance. This roof appearance consists of identical 5" X 12" rectangles repeating endlessly across the roof.
  • Laminated Shingles start off with much the same construction as a 3-tab or strip shingle but then an extra layer of material cut into a saw-tooth pattern is glued on (or laminated) to the exposed portion of the shingle. This makes the shingle thicker and longer lasting. In addition, multiple variations in the saw-toothed give the shingle a varied thatched-like appearance so that the roof does not show any repeating pattern. This combination of extra thickness and random appearance is much more successful in hiding the defects in the roof deck and is one of these shingles main attributes. While these shingles are considerably different, as a class, from the 3-tab shingles there is little or no difference in appearance between the 30, 40 and 50 year versions.
  • Hail Resistant Shingles also come in both 3-tab and laminated styles. However the 3-tab style carries a 30 year warranty and the laminated style carries the 50 year warranty. These shingles do not appear any different to the naked eye from the regular 3-tab and laminated shingles. However they are manufactured using a special asphalt called modified bitumen, which contains 2 types of special chemical modifiers known as elastifiers and UV blockers.
  • Specialty Shingles - Although specialty shingles only account for 2-3% of the composition shingle market there is a large number of different types and styles to choose from. There are shingles embossed with a wood grain, shingles designed to look like slate, extremely heavy and thick shingles, shingles with multiple layers of laminate and even copper plated shingles.

The Roofing Shingles Installation Process

  1. Complete removal of the existing roof system including shingles, tile, asphalt sealants, boots, vents, and fasteners.
  2. Remove and replace any and all rotted roof sheathing throughout entire roof area.
  3. Remove and replace any and all rotted fascia board that is accessible without the removal of exterior structures.
  4. Refasten entire roof deck using 8d ring shank nails to “code plus” strength. *Note: this step may qualify for insurance reductions. (Options available)
  5. Install new modified rubber self-adhered leak barrier underlayment to entire roof surface. *Note: use of this underlayment may qualify for a reduction on your insurance. (Options available)
  6. Install new modified rubber flat roof membrane at dead valley / wall up-step / chimney / cricket detail areas, fastened, masticsized, and anchored to wall using fascia/cap anchor bar, where applicable.
  7. Install new modified rubber flat roof membrane at flat roof tie-in, fastened and masticsized, where applicable.
  8. Install new velux, self-flashed, all in one tempered glass hurricane rated, leak proof skylights over existing openings, fastened and masticsized where applicable. (Options available)
  9. Install new lead boots over plumbing stacks, fastened and masticsized, where applicable.
  10. Install new vents over kitchen, dryer, and bathroom exhaust openings, fastened and masticsized, where applicable.
  11. Install new pre-painted drip edge flashings entire perimeter of roof, fastened and masticsized. Color as per customer choice - 4 available.
  12. Install new valley metal down all valley areas, fastened and masticsized where applicable.
  13. Paint all boots and vents to match shingle color where applicable.
  14. Install special high wind resistant starter-strip shingles at perimeter of roof area, fastened and masticsized. (Options available)
  15. Shingle entire roof area using gafelk timberline prestique ultra high definition asphalt / fiberglass, fungus resistant shingles, nailed six (6) nails per shingle. (Options available)
  16. Install special high wind resistant, gafelk seal-a-ridge cap shingles at all crown and hip areas, fastened. (Options available)
  17. Install new solar powered attic ventilators with thermostat control, Shingle Ridge Vent or Shingle Off Ridge Vent to achieve proper attic ventilation. (Options available)
  18. Clean up and remove all debris. Use magnet to remove fasteners from lawn.

Call Amherst Roofing of Naples, Florida today for more information on Shingle Roofs.  Amherst Roofing serves all of Collier County and Lee County in Florida.

 
Seven Commonly Asked Questions | Print |

 

Q. How can I know when a roof system has problems?

A. All too often, roof system problems are discovered after leaking or other serious damage occurs. Periodic (twice-a-year) inspections often can uncover cracked, warped or missing shingles; loose seams and deteriorated flashings; excessive surface granules accumulating in the gutters or downspouts; and other visible signs of roof problems. Indoors, look for cracked paint, discolored plasterboard, and peeling wallpaper as signs of damaged roof areas.

Q. What are my options if I decide to reroof?

A. You have two basic options: You can choose a complete replacement of the roof system, involving a tear-off of the old roof, or a re-cover over the existing roof, involving only the installation of a new membrane and surfacing. If you've already had one re-cover over your original roof, check with a professional roofing contractor to see if your deck can support a second re-cover.

Q. My roof leaks. Do I need to have it totally replaced?

A. Not necessarily. Leaking can result because some flashings have come loose or a section of the roof system has been damaged. A roof system failure, however, generally is irreversible and results from improper installation or choice of materials or from the installation of a roof system inappropriate for the building.

Q. Can't I just do the work myself?

A. Most work should not be do-it-yourself. Professional roofing contractors are trained to safely and efficiently repair or replace a roof system. Novices can harm a roof with improper roofing techniques and severely injure themselves by falling off or even through a roof in need of repair or replacement.

Home owner maintenance should be confined to roof system inspections in the fall and spring to check for cracked or curling shingles and to cleaning rain gutters filled with dead leaves and other debris. If you must see the roof for yourself, use a firmly braced or tied-off ladder equipped with rubber safety feet. Wear rubber-soled shoes and stay on the ladder (and off the roof), if possible.

Q. How long can I expect my roof system to last?

A. The condition and lifespan of your roof system will depend on the type of roof system you have, the effects of your local environment, and the maintenance the roof system has received. According to the American Society of Home Inspectors, asphalt shingles generally last 15 to 20 years; wood shingle/shakes, 10 to 40 years; clay/concrete tiles, 20+ years; slate, 30 to 100 years; and metal roofing, 15 to 40+ years.

Roofing product manufacturers offer a variety of warranties on their products. Take a close look at those warranties to see what responsibilities and financial obligations they will assume if their products fail to reach their expected lifetimes.

Q. What will a new roof system cost?

A. The price of a new roof system varies widely, depending on the material selected, the contractor doing the work, the home itself, location of the home or building, local labor rates, time of year, and more. To get a good idea of the cost for your roof system, get three or four estimates from reputable contractors in your area. Keep in mind that cost is only one factor, and it must be balanced with the quality of the materials and workmanship.

For each roofing material, there are different grades—and corresponding prices. Plus, there are a variety of styles and shapes. You need to look at the full product range and make a choice based on your budget and needs.

Within the roofing profession, there are different levels of expertise and craftsmanship. Pick a contractor who is committed to quality work.

Q. How can I determine my annual cost?

A. When mulling over your roofing options, the following formula may help:

Total Cost (materials and labor) ÷ Life Expectancy of Roof (in years) = Annual Cost

Call Amherst Roofing of Naples, Florida today for more information about you Roofing Needs. Amherst Roofing has been serving all of Collier County and Lee County since 1987. Call today at 239-594-1133 or visit us at:
www.amherstroofingnaples.com

 
Roof Damage after a Strom, Call Amherst Roofinng | Print |

SomeAt Amherst Roofing of Naples, Florida we are committed to the highest level of customer service. This includes open, honest and frequent communications with our customers. We encourage your questions and enjoy answering them. Here are some of the questions we hear most frequently.

Q. How much will my new roof cost?
A. The cost of your roof will depend on its size, shape, slope and the number of existing roof layers, along with the materials you choose for the roof. We’ll be happy to provide you with a free estimate.

Q. Do you charge for estimates?
A. No, we provide written estimates free of charge.

Q. What is the best type of roofing material for my home?
A. We will inspect your home to determine the best methods, materials, warranties, and prices for your home. Amherst Roofing installs Shingle Roofs, Tile Roof, Flat Roofs, Metal Roofs and much more, giving you a wide variety of choices. After a bad storm that has Roof Damage all that my be required is some Roof Repairs. Amherst Roofing of Naples, Floirda will inspect your roof and give you your best options.

Q. Can you install a new roof over the existing roof?
A. Yes, but the preferred method is to remove the old roof. Removal allows for inspection of the substrate, and the elimination of any wet, rough, and/or unstable existing materials.

Q. What do you do with debris from my old roof?
A. All debris is taken to the landfill and disposed of properly. After your roof is repaired or replaces our crew will always clean up all debris around your home.

Q. What kind of roofing warranties will I get?
A. Material warranties are usually issued by the manufacturers for periods of five (5) to fifty (50) years, depending on the type of roof you choose. We will discuss with you all your options and manufacture warranties.  Amherst Roofing also offers our own guarantee of workmanship.

Q. Will you make a mess of my property?
A. Roofing can be messy, but neatness is very important to us. We protect shrubs, landscaping and the surround yard, and clean our work area and the surround yard area at the conclusion of every workday.

Q. How long will it take to install my roof?
A. Most residential roofs can be replaced in one day if you choose a shingle roof. Metal Roofs and Tile Roofs require more time and depending the size of your roof. If additional days are required, we’ll secure your home against the weather overnight.

Q. Can I choose my own roof color?
A. It used to be you had a very limited choice in colors for shingles or tile. Today’s roofs, however, are available in a much wider array of colors and styles, in shingle, tile or metal.

GET A FREE ESTIMATE FOR ROOFING REPAIRS OR A NEW ROOF IN THE COLLIER COUNTY, FLORIDA AREA BY AMHERST ROOFING TODAY.  SERVING ALL OF SOUTHWEST FLORIDA SINCE 1987.  CALL US TODAY AT 239-594-1133.

 

 
 
Getting Your Money's Worth on a New Roof | Print |


WHAT ARE THE OPTIONS?
Amherst Roofing of Naples, Florida 

There are a number of things to consider when selecting a new roof system. Of course, cost and durability head the list, but aesthetics and architectural style are important, too. The right roof system is the one that balances these four considerations.

Asphalt shingles—which possess an overwhelming share of the U.S. residential roofing market—can be reinforced with either organic or fiberglass materials. Although shingles reinforced with organic felts have been around much longer, fiberglass-reinforced products now dominate the market.

Organic shingles consist of a cellulose-fiber (i.e., wood) base that is saturated with asphalt and coated with colored mineral granules. To fight fungus growth in warm, wet climates, they are available with special algicide granules.

Fiberglass shingles consist of a fiberglass mat, top-and-bottom layers of asphalt, and mineral granules. Typically, a fiberglass mat offers greater durability, but its manufacture is important.

The fire resistance of asphalt shingles, like most other roofing materials, is categorized by Underwriters Laboratories Inc. (UL) Class A, B, or C. Class A is the most fire-resistant, while Classes B and C have less fire resistance. Generally, most fiberglass shingles have Class A fire ratings, and most organic shingles have Class C ratings. UL Class A fire ratings are available for certain products that incorporate a factory-applied, fire-resistant treatment.

A shingle's reinforcement will have little effect on its appearance. Both organic and fiberglass products are available in laminated (architectural) grades that offer a textured appearance. Zinc or copper-coated ceramic granules also can be applied to either organic or fiberglass products to protect against algae attack, a common problem in hot, humid climates. Both types of shingles also are available in a variety of colors.

Wood shingles and shakes are made from cedar, redwood, southern pine, and other woods. Shingles are machine-sawn; shakes are hand-hewn and rougher looking. Their natural look is popular in California, the Northwest, and parts of the Midwest. A point to consider: Some local building codes limit their use because of concerns about fire resistance. Many wood shingles and shakes only have a UL Class C fire rating (or no rating at all).

Tile—clay or concrete—is a durable but fairly expensive roofing material. "Mission-style" and "Spanish" round-topped tiles are used widely in the Southwest and Florida, and flat styles also are available to create French and English looks. Tile is available in a variety of colors and finishes. Note: Tile is heavy. If you are replacing another type of roof system with tile, you will need to verify that the structure will support the load.

Slate is quarried in places such as Vermont, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Canada. It comes in different colors and grades, depending on its origin. Considered virtually indestructible, it is, however, more expensive than other roofing materials. In addition, its application requires skill and experience. Many old homes in the Northeast still are protected by this long-lasting roofing material.

Metal, primarily thought of as a commercial roofing material, has been found to be an attractive roofing alternative for home owners. There are a variety of metal shingles intended to simulate traditional roof coverings, such as wood shakes, shingles, and tile. Apart from metal roofing's longevity, metal shingles are relatively lightweight, typically have a Class A fire rating, have a greater resistance to adverse weather, and can be aesthetically pleasing.

Synthetic roof products simulate various types of traditional roof coverings, such as slate and wood shingles and shakes. A point to consider: Although synthetic roof products may simulate the appearance of traditional roof coverings, they do not necessarily have the same properties.

We recommend that you look at full-size samples of the proposed product, along with manufacturers' brochures, or visit a building that is roofed with that product before making a buying decision.

All roof systems have five basic components:

Roof structure: the rafters and trusses constructed to support the sheathing.

Deck/sheathing: the boards or sheet material that are fastened to the roof rafters to cover a house.

Underlayment: a sheet of asphalt-saturated material used as a secondary layer of protection for the roof deck.

Roof covering: shingles, tiles, etc., that protect the sheathing from weather.

Drainage: the features of the roof system's design, such as shape, slope, layout, etc., that affect its ability to shed water.

Flashing: sheet metal or other material laid into the various joints and valleys of a roof system to prevent water seepage.

Call Amherst Roofing of Naples, Florida for a free estimate. We Serve all of Naples, Florida. Amherst Roofing also serves all of Bonita Springs, Marco Island, Estero, Fort Myers and Golden Gate. Basically we serve all of South West Florida. Visit us at: www.AmherstRoofingNaples.com.

 
Commonly Asked Questions | Print |

Amherst Roofing of Naples, Florida
Seven Most Common Questions Asked

Q. How can I know when a roof system has problems?

A. All too often, roof system problems are discovered after leaking or other serious damage occurs. Periodic (twice-a-year) inspections often can uncover cracked, warped or missing shingles; loose seams and deteriorated flashings; excessive surface granules accumulating in the gutters or downspouts; and other visible signs of roof problems. Indoors, look for cracked paint, discolored plasterboard, and peeling wallpaper as signs of damaged roof areas.

Q. What are my options if I decide to reroof?

A. You have two basic options: You can choose a complete replacement of the roof system, involving a tear-off of the old roof, or a re-cover over the existing roof, involving only the installation of a new membrane and surfacing. If you've already had one re-cover over your original roof, check with a professional roofing contractor to see if your deck can support a second re-cover.

Q. My roof leaks. Do I need to have it totally replaced?

A. Not necessarily. Leaking can result because some flashings have come loose or a section of the roof system has been damaged. A roof system failure, however, generally is irreversible and results from improper installation or choice of materials or from the installation of a roof system inappropriate for the building.

Q. Can't I just do the work myself?

A. Most work should not be do-it-yourself. Professional roofing contractors are trained to safely and efficiently repair or replace a roof system. Novices can harm a roof with improper roofing techniques and severely injure themselves by falling off or even through a roof in need of repair or replacement.

Home owner maintenance should be confined to roof system inspections in the fall and spring to check for cracked or curling shingles and to cleaning rain gutters filled with dead leaves and other debris. If you must see the roof for yourself, use a firmly braced or tied-off ladder equipped with rubber safety feet. Wear rubber-soled shoes and stay on the ladder (and off the roof), if possible.

Q. How long can I expect my roof system to last?

A. The condition and lifespan of your roof system will depend on the type of roof system you have, the effects of your local environment, and the maintenance the roof system has received. According to the American Society of Home Inspectors, asphalt shingles generally last 15 to 20 years; wood shingle/shakes, 10 to 40 years; clay/concrete tiles, 20+ years; slate, 30 to 100 years; and metal roofing, 15 to 40+ years.

Roofing product manufacturers offer a variety of warranties on their products. Take a close look at those warranties to see what responsibilities and financial obligations they will assume if their products fail to reach their expected lifetimes.

Q. What will a new roof system cost?

A. The price of a new roof system varies widely, depending on the material selected, the contractor doing the work, the home itself, location of the home or building, local labor rates, time of year, and more. To get a good idea of the cost for your roof system, get three or four estimates from reputable contractors in your area. Keep in mind that cost is only one factor, and it must be balanced with the quality of the materials and workmanship.

For each roofing material, there are different grades—and corresponding prices. Plus, there are a variety of styles and shapes. You need to look at the full product range and make a choice based on your budget and needs.

Within the roofing profession, there are different levels of expertise and craftsmanship. Pick a contractor who is committed to quality work.

Q. How can I determine my annual cost?

A. When mulling over your roofing options, the following formula may help:

Total Cost (materials and labor) ÷ Life Expectancy of Roof (in years) = Annual Cost

Amherst Roofing of Naples, Florida which serves all of Collier and Lee County is available to answer any questions you may have about any Roofing Needs. Our Company has been serving Naples, FL for over 30 years. Call today at: 239-594-1133.

 
Amherst Roofing, Inc. on Buying a New Roof | Print |

Buying a new roof ...

WHAT ARE THE OPTIONS?

There are a number of things to consider when selecting a new roof system. Of course, cost and durability head the list, but aesthetics and architectural style are important, too. The right roof system is the one that balances these four considerations.

 

Asphalt shingles—which possess an overwhelming share of the U.S. residential roofing market—can be reinforced with either organic or fiberglass materials. Although shingles reinforced with organic felts have been around much longer, fiberglass-reinforced products now dominate the market.

 

Organic shingles consist of a cellulose-fiber (i.e., wood) base that is saturated with asphalt and coated with colored mineral granules. To fight fungus growth in warm, wet climates, they are available with special algicide granules.

 

Fiberglass shingles consist of a fiberglass mat, top-and-bottom layers of asphalt, and mineral granules. Typically, a fiberglass mat offers greater durability, but its manufacture is important.

 

The fire resistance of asphalt shingles, like most other roofing materials, is categorized by Underwriters Laboratories Inc. (UL) Class A, B, or C. Class A is the most fire-resistant, while Classes B and C have less fire resistance. Generally, most fiberglass shingles have Class A fire ratings, and most organic shingles have Class C ratings. UL Class A fire ratings are available for certain products that incorporate a factory-applied, fire-resistant treatment.

 

A shingle's reinforcement will have little effect on its appearance. Both organic and fiberglass products are available in laminated (architectural) grades that offer a textured appearance. Zinc or copper-coated ceramic granules also can be applied to either organic or fiberglass products to protect against algae attack, a common problem in hot, humid climates. Both types of shingles also are available in a variety of colors.

 

Wood shingles and shakes are made from cedar, redwood, southern pine, and other woods. Shingles are machine-sawn; shakes are hand-hewn and rougher looking. Their natural look is popular in California, the Northwest, and parts of the Midwest. A point to consider: Some local building codes limit their use because of concerns about fire resistance. Many wood shingles and shakes only have a UL Class C fire rating (or no rating at all).

 

Tile—clay or concrete—is a durable but fairly expensive roofing material. "Mission-style" and "Spanish" round-topped tiles are used widely in the Southwest and Florida, and flat styles also are available to create French and English looks. Tile is available in a variety of colors and finishes. Note: Tile is heavy. If you are replacing another type of roof system with tile, you will need to verify that the structure will support the load.

 

Slate is quarried in places such as Vermont, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Canada. It comes in different colors and grades, depending on its origin. Considered virtually indestructible, it is, however, more expensive than other roofing materials. In addition, its application requires skill and experience. Many old homes in the Northeast still are protected by this long-lasting roofing material.

 

Metal, primarily thought of as a commercial roofing material, has been found to be an attractive roofing alternative for home owners. There are a variety of metal shingles intended to simulate traditional roof coverings, such as wood shakes, shingles, and tile. Apart from metal roofing's longevity, metal shingles are relatively lightweight, typically have a Class A fire rating, have a greater resistance to adverse weather, and can be aesthetically pleasing.

 

Synthetic roof products simulate various types of traditional roof coverings, such as slate and wood shingles and shakes. A point to consider: Although synthetic roof products may simulate the appearance of traditional roof coverings, they do not necessarily have the same properties.

 

We recommend that you look at full-size samples of the proposed product, along with manufacturers' brochures, or visit a building that is roofed with that product before making a buying decision.

Call Amherst Roofing today for a Free Estimate at 239-594-1133.

 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 Next > End >>

Page 1 of 2